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Welcome Razzball football readers to the offseason. I know some of you are going “what’s an offseason?” as your significant other rolls there eyes. Since there is no such thing as an “offseason”, I am here to fill that void for you. I am bringing you a series that’s going to take a look back at last year and beyond to help identify value and non-value players for next season. I don’t want to say it’s a “new” series as if you remember last year. I did a similar thing for Dase’s Digest with players such as Carson Palmer (nailed it!), Jonathan Stewart (nailed it!) and Teddy Bridgwater (did I mention how I really nailed it for Carson Palmer?). The difference with this offseason is that I have a full and thick beard… that and I’m not talking about 2015. So as I stroke my beard, it’s on to 2016 and the third player up is Martavis Bryant.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Lacysqu

Welcome Razzball football readers to the offseason. I know some of you are going “what’s an offseason?” as your significant other rolls there eyes. Since there is no such thing as an “offseason”, I am here to fill that void for you. I am bringing you a series that’s going to take a look back at last year and beyond to help identify value and non-value players for next season. I don’t want to say it’s a “new” series as if you remember last year. I did a similar thing for Dase’s Digest with players such as Carson Palmer (nailed it!), Jonathan Stewart (nailed it!) and Teddy Bridgwater (did I mention how I really nailed it for Carson Palmer?). The difference with this offseason is that I have a full and thick beard… that and I’m not talking about 2015. So as I stroke my beard, it’s on to 2016 and the second player up is Eddie Lacy.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Eliteflaccow415

Welcome Razzball Football readers to the offseason. I know some of you are going “what’s an offseason?” as your significant other rolls their eyes. Since there is no such thing as an “offseason”, I am here to fill that void for you. I am bringing you a series that’s going to take a look back at last year and beyond to help identify value and non-value players for next season. I don’t want to say it’s a “new” series, as if you’d remember last year. I did a similar thing for my Dase’s Digest with players such as Carson Palmer (nailed it!), Jonathan Stewart (nailed it!) and Teddy Bridgwater (did I mention how I really nailed it for Carson Palmer?). The difference with this offseason is that I have a full and thick beard… that and I’m not talking about 2015. So as I stroke my beard, it’s on to 2016 and the first player up is Joe Flacco!

Please, blog, may I have some more?

With the NFL going to more and more of a passing league, the ability to find a signal caller that can provide you not just serviceable production at your quarterback spot, but the ability to give you quality production is ever so easy to spot and find later in the draft. With the quarterback position being littered with so many quality arms, a popular avenue to go with this position is the (Razzball approved) quarterback by committee (QBBC) approach. This is where you wait until at least the 10th round (heck, even later) of your draft and you grab one-to-three quarterbacks (depending on format) that you will play match-ups with each week.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

There once was a time that I was a believer in drafting running backs early and often. In fact, I wanted to draft a running back with my first, second, and third pick, even in points per reception (PPR) formats. My goal was to always come away with at least three running backs after my fifth pick. However, as I was prepping for draft season (last spring), I noticed a consistent trend … Once the fourth round came around, I found myself seeing a nice size group of running backs just sitting there. The ability to load up on a more consistent and higher scoring position like wide receiver and the added ability to get a huge advantage at tight end with the likes of Jimmy Graham or Julius Thomas starting looking attractive. All while, you could wait and pluck between two-to-three running backs in the fourth through eight round of any draft. I had a lot of fun (outside the box drafting), and it didn’t hurt to mix in some success with this game plan.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

With the NFL going to more and more of a passing league, the ability to find a signal caller that can provide you not just serviceable production at your quarterback spot, but the ability to give you quality production is ever so easy to spot and find later in the draft. With the quarterback position being littered with so many quality arms a popular avenue to go with this position is the quarterback by committee (QBBC) approach. This is where you wait until at least the 10th round (heck, even later) of your draft and you grab one-to-three quarterbacks (depending on format) that you will play match-ups with each week.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

One of my favorite things about fantasy football is the tracking of average draft position (ADP). I don’t care that it’s only mid May and the NFL draft is only a couple weeks in the books. I am always interested in seeing were the mind of the so called “experts” and the “average Joe’s” (me) are at when it comes to valuing certain players. I believe it’s never to early to being able to spot trends among players or positions that will be of valuable information come your draft or drafts. Now that we got that out of the way, I would like to talk about one trend that seems to have caught my eye in early drafts. It has to do with the wide receiver group, in particular, the older players and them being undervalued that is looming large at the moment.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

The St. Louis Rams had a backfield of Isaiah Pead, Zac Stacy and Daryl Richardson going into the 2013 seasonTwo of these backs (Pead/Richardson) were coming off their rookie years, and Stacy was newly drafted. Pead, in his rookie season, carried the football 10 times for 54 yards (5.4 YPC). Stacy, who was a 5th round pick from the University of Vanderbilt, had a stat line of 1,167 rushing yards (5.7 YPC), and 12 rushing touchdowns per season in his last two years of college. And Richardson, in 2012, rushed 98 times for 475 yards (4.8 YPC) and was able to catch 24 passes for 163 yards. Digging a little bit deeper into his first year, I found a stretch of games from week 6-12 (five games) in which he carried the football 46 times for 281 yards (6.1 YPC) and also caught 11 passes for 81 yards. As fantasy owners, it was up to us to pick the player that we thought could bring the most fantasy production. Just for your amusement at my suffering, I actually chose Richardson. Hmmmm…. There seems to be a growing trend in these intros of mine.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

The free agency period and NFL draft has come and gone, rookies are being signed, and teams are actually taking the field. All this means is that not only are we closer to baseball season being over (thank you!), but it’s time for fantasy football (it’s a year-round thing for some of us. Shhhhh, please don’t tell my wife…)

The rankings are starting to tumble out here at Razzball, and the most recent was the tight end position (Non-PPR Rankings, PPR Rankings). The first thing I did with the newly released rankings was start digging for players that I feel are being ranked lower than they should be. I know it’s nothing new, but I am all about finding those draft day bargains. I want to try and get maximum value for each one of my draft selections. With all that being said, I am going to shine some light on three players that will bring much more in return compared to their current rank. I will be focusing on the PPR ranks and 12-team leagues, being that is what the Razzball Commentary Leagues (RCL) will be using for scoring.

Please, blog, may I have some more?
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