Well, if you thought Week 1 had a lot of injuries to keep track of, you had no idea what was coming.

Last Sunday saw three star QB’s suffer or complicate major injuries, while a slew of different backs and receivers saw themselves out of contests late into games with an abundance of injuries.

Let’s talk about some of the players who landed on the injury report this week.

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Week 2 is almost in the books with only a Monday Night Football tilt between the Browns and Jets remaining. A couple of star running backs had scares over the weekend, and few week 1 handcuffs produced. Don’t get caught with your pants down and avoid the risk of a league-mate snagging up a starting backup. Let’s jump right in to this week’s handcuff report.

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There wasn’t much that the Cleveland Browns could do for your fantasy teams but we’ll get to that in a little bit. I’m talking about Marquise Brown and A.J. Brown, the pair of rookie wide receivers that played their way into triple digit receiving yards in week 1. A.J. Brown was probably the bigger surprise for the Tennessee Titans. For one, there wasn’t much buzz around him during the preseason. Also, nobody really believes in Marcus Mariota. A.J. Brown caught 3 of his for targets for 100 yards but wasn’t able to score a touchdown. HOLLYWOOD Marquise Brown did sneak through the secondary and score two touchdowns against the Dolphins. He caught 4 of his 5 targets for 147 yards. 

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Week 1’s of the NFL season are always interesting. Not only do we have such high expectations for almost each team after a long and tedious offseason, but we’re always surprised at which defenses decide to show up, and which don’t. Which offenses show up, and which don’t. There are a bunch of fantastic advanced metrics and stats to show both offensive and defensive efficiency, yet, after a long offseason full of roster moves, teams are bound to get drastically better or worse on either offense or defense. And over the next few weeks or so, we’ll have a better idea of which defenses we should target, and which to stay away from.

They say never bench your studs, and that’s mostly correct. So let’s talk about who you should bench, and more importantly, who you should start.

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Razzbowl 2019 is in the books and it provides a great opportunity to delve into how a strategy can change throughout a single draft. I’m hoping this breakdown can stir up your thought process in your own drafts as everyone is unique. In my mind, the biggest mistake people who play in a single home league or just for fun make is to just draft to rankings/ADP. I spend so little time ranking players. I spend far more time: placing players into tiers, reviewing what I believe the actual NFL teams offenses will look like, how the seasons will go for those teams, coming up with an initial strategy for each individual draft, pinpointing my favorite players to start off the draft from each chunk of draft positions (early/middle/late), and finally matching player value to rounds in the draft. Hopefully that makes sense. To put this idea into simper terms: Many people spend an excessive amount of time worrying about the order in which players like Josh Jacobs, Mark Ingram, and Chris Carson should be picked. I tend to not worry about the actual order, and try to spend more time coming up with what I believe is most likely going to happen with those teams, what could happen with that team, who I’ve drafted before that choice comes up, and just as important… what my plan is the rest of the way if I were to pick each of those players.

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A friend and I were recently texting during a mock draft and he kept finding pockets of players with similar ADP and seemingly similar upside. We would go back and forth making points and counterpoints, but in the end, with the timer running out, it was just a gut call. I realized that may not be optimal and ventured to create a “checklist” of sorts to compare similar players alongside each other.

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I am enjoying writing up rankings “the Grey way”. I think that it’s helpful to add a little blurb with the player and to put them in tiers. When I’m looking at fantasy baseball information in the early spring, this is the specific format that I like reading for my rankings. I assume that since you are here, you are already a Grey/Razzball fan, so I hope that you feel at home with this format.

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Nice work by Greg Smith (@gregsauce) to be the first tout to be in double digits in a while with a 10. The readers took it on the chin last week with McCrackalax11’s 7 the best of a struggling bunch. To urge you to try out Rudy’s Pigskinonator I’m going to feature it’s responses to props this week. You need the help, trust me. Rudy’s projections are smashing as per usual. Put them to the test in THIS WEEK’S PROPS.

Which TE scores more PPR points on Saturday?

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Man it would have been very interesting had yesterday’s Chargers-Chiefs game been on the main slate. That’s because Keenan Allen, Tyreek Hill and Travis Kelce were all fantastic plays (particularly Keenan Allen, who Rudy’s projections had as the #1 WR on the slate by far), and would have all had significant ownership. You’d be looking at many lineups with a bad performance (Kelce and his 9.2) and a complete dud (the zero from Allen as he got hurt). You’d also be looking at a lot of lineups that picked either Jackson or Damien Williams, but not both, and the difference (27.3 for Williams, 16 for Jackson) would likely put the Jackson lineups drawing very thin, and possibly render them drawing dead if they played Allen and Kelce with that money. Alas, the game was on Thursday, so while it made for great TV, and made for an interesting showdown slate, only those who played the full Thursday-Monday slate care about it’s effects on a full slate. If you did play the Thursday-Monday slate, and you played Keenan Allen (and you did not play Jackson or Williams), I’d highly suggest pivoting your lineup to high-upside non-chalk plays to try to make up the lost ground.

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