When looking at rookie quarterbacks, redraft league players can pretty much forget the class and even dynasty league managers with 1QB don’t need to stick their neck out for a rookie. However, with the growing popularity of superflex and 2QB leagues, selecting a rookie signal caller has become more important.  These types of leagues are often starved for starting QBs and the only way to obtain one is a difficult trade or drafting an incoming prospect. For managers in these types of leagues, this could be the most important article you read this summer! 

Two metrics that I value in quarterbacks are completion percentage and yards per attempt. If a prospect can deliver the ball to his receiver as well as challenge the defense downfield, that’s likely a recipe for success. For more information on my process, check out last year’s rookie quarterback rankings

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We are now in the thick of summer when baseball is just treading water until the NFL preseason starts. Have no fear! I have my top 10 running backs post-draft.  

Without getting too technical, my process heavily weighs volume for running backs. It has been shown that usage in college projects usage in the pros, with the occasional exception. Other college production metrics come into play such as efficiency AND volume is better than volume alone and of course draft capital equals opportunity which must be considered. Finally, yes, I do turn on the tape and see what traits jump out and how they convert their skills into the production the stats show.

This list reflects who I would prefer in a vacuum on talent alone. Landing spot is a bigger consideration for me at the running back position than it is for quarterbacks or receivers. So, there will be a higher likelihood of shuffling post draft on this list compared to other positions. Still, I think we should pick players mostly on talent first and the other factors are more like tie-breakers rather than a major consideration. See my pre-draft article for additional insight. 

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Not much changed after the draft, which is probably how it should be. While some landing spots may pay more immediate dividends, talent wins out in the end. Landing spot has nothing to do with talent. Draft capital is a different story, as the round selected does project future success. But I try not to concern myself too much with the actual team a player gets drafted to. 

There were some movers such as Kadarius Toney and D’Wayne Eskridge who secured earlier picks than I assumed. In the case of Toney, despite not being impressed by his profile, there comes a point where first round capital trumps my personal evaluation. Let me know what you think in the comments! Who did I miss? Who shouldn’t be here? 

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Hello all, it’s the most wonderful time of the year – NFL draft season. I have put together my top 10 running backs for you using a combination of production metrics and film.

Without getting too technical, my process heavily weighs volume for running backs. It has been shown that usage in college projects usage in the pros (with the occasional exception). Other college production metrics come into play, for example, efficiency AND volume is better than volume alone and of course projected draft capital has to be considered. Finally, the last step is to turn on the tape and see what traits jump out and how they convert their skills into the production that the stats show.

This list reflects who I would prefer in a vacuum on talent alone. Landing spot is a bigger consideration for me at the running back position than it is for quarterbacks or receivers. So, there will be a higher likelihood of shuffling post draft on this list compared to other positions. Still, I think we should pick players mostly on talent first and the other factors are more like tie-breakers rather than a major consideration. All metrics come from the campus2canton.com data app and athletic testing from mockdraftable.com.

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Hello all, it’s the most wonderful time of the year when hot takes are all the rage and us nerds get to wax poetic about what those silly NFL GMs should do at the end of April. I have put together my top 15 wide receivers for you using a combination of production metrics and film. Without getting too technical, my process is to group players into tiers based on breakout age and other college production metrics which and project draft capital and expected upside then refine those rankings within a tier by watching them play.

This list reflects who I would prefer in a vacuum on talent alone. Of course NFL draft capital and landing spot will come into play, but I think we should pick players on talent first and the other factors are more like tie-breakers rather than a major consideration. All metrics come from the campus2canton.com data app.

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The fantasy regular season is in the books and I already laid out rankings for the playoffs. So what else is there to do but look ahead into the crystal ball and see what 2021 could have in store. As always, this is not format specific but a general ranking based simply on who I’d rather see on my roster in 2021. I am happy to talk specifics in the comments, as the note section is not meant to be a thesis explaining the position of each ranking. 

I have included some choice rookies for 2021, although in all likelihood there will be more that make their way into the top 80 by season’s end. This year there are currently 5 rookies in the top 50 WR in fantasy points per game. With offenses using more 3 and 4 wide formations, rookies can get on the field early and often. Earning snaps is the biggest hurdle for most rookies but that is not as hard as it used to be when only 2 WRs were featured. Rookie receivers should continue to be assets even in redraft leagues, so I have been generous in my rankings with 2 rookies already in the top 36. 

Read all of the QB, RB and TE Razzball Rest of Season Positional Rankings now!

And without further ado… 

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So you’ve made it into the second round of your fantasy league playoffs… or you’re a spiteful little thing and want to know what kind of guys you can block your league mates from getting.  The bar for getting added to a playoff team is pretty high, so I am being choosy with who get listed, but it’s possible you have some holes to fill. 

I group the adds by position and then within the position, rank them in order of preference. With the playoffs upon us, I have removed percentages of the FAAB. If you need any of these guys to start for your team, then spend what you need to spend. The sherpa will only advise players who are rostered in less than 50% of ESPN leagues.

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Your WR top 80 14.0 is here!  This is a playoff specific edition of the WR ranks, with extra weight given to the next 3 matchups specifically. Nothing matters but the path ahead so a few players jumped up because of their schedule. Additionally guys who are currently injured might as well be off the list, although some are straggling around like Kenny Golladay, but there is no guarantee he’ll suit up for our fantasy teams.  

This list is not league or format specific, but it is based on 2020 rest-of-season projection only. When thinking through tiers and rankings I asked myself simply – “all things considered who would I rather have on my roster?”

Read all of the QB, RB and TE Razzball Rest of Season Positional Rankings now!

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Congratulations! If you’re reading this, I assume you made into your league’s playoff bracket. There’s not a lot of meat on the bone but hopefully you don’t need a ton of help from here on. However, if there are any holes to fill I might be able to help.

I group the adds by position and then within the position, rank them in order of preference. With the playoffs upon us, I have removed percentages of the FAAB. If you need any of these guys to start for your team, then spend what you need to spend. The sherpa will only advise players who are rostered in less than 50% of ESPN leagues.

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Your WR top 80 13.0 is here!  Even though week 12 hasn’t ended yet, we’re on to the final countdown. If you’re 7-5 or better you can probably coast but a playoff seed may be on the line. If you’re rolling at 6-6 or in some leagues maybe even 5-7 this is do or die. Obviously “rest of season” doesn’t really mean much with one game left in the regular season but this is still a relative ranking of the best WRs in our game. As a rule, injuries will always bump guys down. I am generally pessimistic that players will return on time at full strength without a setback. 

This list is not league or format specific, but it is based on 2020 rest-of-season projection only. When thinking through tiers and rankings I asked myself simply – “all things considered who would I rather have on my roster?”

Read all of the QB, RB and TE Razzball Rest of Season Positional Rankings now!

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