If you missed the special announcement a little while back, we have officially launched our 2019 Razzball Commenter Leagues on Fantrax, with the Top 10 overall finishers in the RCL’s getting a spot booked in the 2020 Razzbowl! It’s quite the prize, and I can’t wait to see how the year shakes out. Lots of spots are still open to play against some of our staff writers. Be sure to sign up for a league as soon as possible

Today will be the final post in a series I started two weeks ago, which will be to take a look at the ADP rankings provided by Fantrax (which is gathered by their own site-hosted drafts), and compare that to our own 2019  projections provided by our stat guru/oracle/wizard Rudy Gamble, to identify which players to target, and which to stay away from. Simply put, which players are we high on compared to Fantrax? Which players are we lower on?

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In the first two rounds, you picked the players that you are going to build your team around. Whether you picked two wide receivers, two running backs, or a wide receiver and a running back, the next three rounds are absolutely crucial in building you roster. In this post, I won’t be getting pick specific because there are a few different ways that you could have built your roster in the first two rounds and it also becomes more draft specific regarding who falls to these rounds. I feel that the best approach is to highlight the players that I’ll be targeting and avoiding in the following three rounds. You can always refer to my rankings if your draft board looks different than fantasy football calculator’s ADP. In some spots, it most definitely will look different. Especially when you are doing a live draft with your buddies instead of a draft online where everyone is looking at the same best player available list. 

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The way that you start your draft is so important. There are land mines in every part of the draft and as analysts (loose term, I prefer good with words and played for a long time or guy who is not allowed within 500 feet of a Dave and Busters), we can only give you an educated guess of where they are. They are buried and we hope that by October we haven’t stepped on any.

I don’t believe in any “avoid” or “zero” position strategies and I also don’t believe in the “best player available” strategy. At that point, you might as well just auto draft. The strategy that I believe in is simple: get the players that fit how you want to build your team. For example: if you believe you can build your receivers around Amari Cooper as your WR1, go ahead and take two strong running backs with your first two picks. If you’re like me, you’re eyeing George Kittle in the third round. So what I’m probably going to do is get James Conner as my RB1 if I land in the back half of the first round and then take Michael Thomas, Odell Beckham Jr., or Mike Evans based on availability in the second round. That way, I have a strong RB1, WR1, and TE to start. Let’s go through the first two rounds in a 12 team PPR draft. If you still play in standard leagues, throat punch your commissioner. Eh, don’t do that, I don’t have bail money for you.

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Training camp is upon us and the NFL beat writers are heating up the twitter sphere with news. This article is an attempt to cut through the noise and figure out what if anything is most important. One vital component that needs to be pointed out is that we should never be relying on beat reporters, or on-lookers to evaluate the actual talent, or what is happening during practice. Writers do just that for a living, write. A few examples of opinions/misconceptions coming into play that were grossly misguided I’ve already seen in week 1:

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We are entering the final week of my rankings extravaganza! Running back is my favorite position to speculate on and the position that I usually lean on in the first round of drafts. I always find myself wanting to build my fantasy teams around a running back that is going to be one of the league leaders in touches. Running back can get thin pretty early and drafts and the later round guys tend to be speculation picks. So here are the top guys to target. 

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Continuing another similar piece to what I’ve been writing about this past week or so, today we’ll be taking a look at Explosive Play Rankings from Sharp Football Stats. Over the past week or so, I’ve been talking a lot about finding fantasy value and bargain players that come from the most successful offenses, or offenses that prioritize the pass or run compared to other teams. Well, today, we’ll be diving into Explosive Play Rankings, and finding out which offenses have explosive run games, and which offenses are explosive through the air. In turn, this should further help us on draft day by targeting lucrative offenses that will produce some of the best fantasy players. 

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There are many advanced stats and metrics in which to judge running backs by. But which are the top metrics to help us separate the best from the rest? Or to uncover a diamond in the rough? Well, thanks to the great work over at Football Outsiders, we have three innovative stats to judge RB’s by: DVOA, DYAR and Success Rate. 

DVOA, or Defense-adjusted Value Over Average, represents a player’s value per play, over an average running back in the same game situations. The more positive the DVOA rating, the better the performance. DYAR, or Defense-adjusted Yards Above Replacement, gives us the value of the performance on plays where the back caught/carried the ball compared to the average replacement level. And finally, Success Rate represents the player’s consistency, measured by successful running plays.

Using data from 2018, let’s take a look at some of the leaders in the NFL in rushing DVOA, DYAR and Success Rate, to help us isolate the backs we should be targeting in drafts. 

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Thanks in part to 5 running backs finishing in the Top 10 in all fantasy positions last year, and with early ADP reports suggesting that we may see eight running backs go off the board in the first rounds of drafts, it’s no surprise that fantasy owners are going to be attacking this position from the […]

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