Quarantine Day 25:

I made a fire in the yard today while pondering my 2020 dynasty rankings. As I gazed into the flames, a series of vivid images began to appear. The Lord of Light was sending me a divine message about dynasty quarterbacks. Or maybe the mushrooms I had eaten were starting to kick in, hard to say. Either way, a life-size image of Kyler Murray arose from the blazing inferno. The meaning was clear, this dull and uneventful 20th year after 2000 will forever be know as the year of Kyler, and nothing else. Anyway, here’s my top 20 dynasty quarterbacks for 2020 fantasy football:   

Please, blog, may I have some more?

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Quarantine Day 22:

Yesterday was my girlfriend’s birthday. To answer your first question, yes, she is imaginary. But I still treated her to a special quarantine walk outside where we foraged for berries and I let her check the beaver traps. Even busted out a nice can of Spam for dinner. The good stuff, only 6 months past expiration. She was especially excited when I told her about my mock draft of players who haven’t been drafted into the NFL yet, for a fake football league that doesn’t exist and will never be played out. Best. Quarantine. Birthday. Ever.

So last week I gave you my dynasty rookie PPR mock draft recap where I acknowledged the mostly-meaningless nature of a pre-NFL draft rookie mock. But we have nothing better to do, so this week’s version was a 10-team, 4-round dynasty rookie mock draft for PPR, superflex leagues:

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Quarantine Day 20:

Time is a flat circle. A circle which begins to look like an octagon after 20 days of solitude in my underground virus bunker. The eight points represent the number of times per hour that I breakdown crying divided how many days I’ve been out of toilet paper. I’ve been spending my days deep in philosophical and metaphysical discussion with my new best friend, a football by the name of Wilstoner. The football’s a real free thinker. On the topic of free thinking, I gave you my top 20 and top 40 dynasty wide receivers for 2020 fantasy football a week or two back. Or maybe it was a month or two back, I don’t even know anymore. This quarantine time octagon has me all mixed up. Anyway, here’s my top 60 dynasty wide receivers for 2020 fantasy football co-authored by Wilstoner the football: 

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Earlier this week I gathered nine of my closest quarantined fantasy football industry friends for an arguably pointless dynasty rookie mock draft. After all, the NFL draft isn’t for another month; we don’t know what team these rookies will be drafted by. We also don’t know in which round those unknown teams will draft them. And we definitely don’t know what their immediate opportunity might look like on those mystery teams. But strangely enough, some dynasty leagues actually hold their rookie drafts prior to the NFL draft. And honestly, my schedule is pretty open these days other than scavenging for toilet paper and other softish paper products calling my butt’s name. Anyway, this was a 10-team, 3-round dynasty rookie mock draft for PPR, 1-QB leagues: 

Please, blog, may I have some more?

The combine has passed, the draft is yet to happen which leaves us in a free agency frenzy… that is unless you are interested in “devy” leagues, short for developmental leagues. In this setup, managers can select players who are still in college (or high school) and stash them on a separate, inactive roster until they are drafted into the NFL.

For the devy manager, there is truly no offseason as we must take the months with no NFL to update our devy ranks and prepare to dig deep and draft some unknown lottery tickets hoping that you can pick up the next Jonathan Taylor or CeeDee Lamb before your league mates even know their name.

Please, blog, may I have some more?

Laviska Shenault Jr. – University of Colorado – 6’1″ 227 lbs. – 10/5/1998 (21 years old)

  • Can shake defenders at the line with moves or physicality. 
  • Understands where to sit against zone coverage. Will take advantage of loose coverage by sitting down quickly and then using his ability to make yards after the catch.
  • Route running will require some refinement.
    • Doesn’t get to his spots at times.
    • Had a difficult time creating separation against tougher corners.
    • Speed doesn’t flash in short and intermediate routes like it does down the field.
  • Something in his running style looks awkward at times. Upright, arms kind of lock into position at his side, and doesn’t look fluid in shorter areas.
  • Occasions where he doesn’t time his route to be able to body the defender to go up and fight for it. Some of his timing issues could be fixed by a more accurate and on time QB at the pro level.
  • Please, blog, may I have some more?

The draft won’t take place in Vegas, and there are conflicting reports out there about whether it will be suspended or not. Regardless, now is as good a time as any to try and get some more profiles out. 

Jalen Reagor – Texas Christian University – 5’11” 206 lbs. – 1/1/99 (21 years old)

Inconsistent quarterback play and the emergence of Taye Barber cut into his workload in his junior season, but Reagor brings an impressive open field ability and glimpses of greatness.

  • Good long speed and strong initial burst can put corners in a chasing position early. 
  • Got work on sweeps and screens to get the ball in his hands and let him work.
  • Ability to take well defended screens and burst outside for 10+ yards and a first down. 
  • Worked on kick off and punt returns. Averaged 20.8 yards per punt return his junior year and the touchdown you see below. 
  • Please, blog, may I have some more?

Two weeks ago I detailed my elaborate self-quarantine plans in the top 40 dynasty running backs post. Unfortunately, we’ve finally reached the tipping point here in the United States. Now I’m in day 3 of self-quarantine, doing my part to help “flatten the curve” and protect our healthcare system. But don’t even think about asking for any of my lotion stockpile, you should’ve taken heed to my warning two weeks back. I have countless hours of dynasty rosterbation ahead. On a related note, can someone please explain why people are buying up all the toilet paper, yet baby wipes are still fully stocked? Are people unfamiliar with the miracle of baby wipes? Anyway, while you’re bored in isolation, take a look at all of our dynasty and rookie rankings for 2020 fantasy football. I went over the top 20 dynasty wide receivers last week, now on to the top 40 dynasty wide receivers for 2020 fantasy football:

Please, blog, may I have some more?

The quarterback landscape for fantasy is a strange one as unlike other positions a quality QB can stay atop the rankings for over a decade with minimal fluctuation. Additionally, only the very elite  QBs really matter for our game, as we know that after a select few passers, replaceability is very high. So, when looking at rookie QBs, redraft league players can pretty much forget the class (unless it’s Kyler Murray *swoon*) and even dynasty league managers with 1QB don’t need to stick their neck out for a rookie. 

However, moving into deep dynasty or leagues where it is required (2QB) or beneficial (superflex) to start multiple QBs, things get interesting. These types of leagues are often starved for starting QBs and the only way to obtain one is a difficult trade or drafting an incoming rookie. For managers in these types of leagues, let’s get to prospecting! 

Please, blog, may I have some more?

The back end of my WR rankings for 2020 include some crushes that I hoped would have generated some buzz at the combine but didn’t, plus one athletic freak that caught everyone’s eye but I still have doubts about. 

In the pre-combine top 30 rookie wide receiver rankings I laid out the key factors I was looking for and why I ranked the players where I did. As a follow up I am now adjusting based on new information such as body mass index (BMI), athletic testing and overall post-combine buzz coming out of Indianapolis. 

There was a lot of movement within the WR rankings because so many players are very close and small details can cause big ripples. I did penalize the players who did not run at the combine because I think in a class so tight, that will matter on draft day, impacting projected draft round.  

A Word About BMI

Numberfire ran a nice study in 2015 and their conclusion was “If we’re talking absolute, elite production, your best bet is more than likely a tall wide receiver, and a heavy one, too.” The correlation was fairly weak, but in general bigger WRs had more success. The study found that the average BMI for WRs that scored 10+ touchdowns was 27.09 and the average BMI declined in groups with less touchdowns. While that was from 2015, this past season saw 10 of the top 12 WR finishers in points per game had a BMI of >26.5 and 7 of them had a BMI >27.

Only DJ Chark (24.1) came in under 26.  I don’t think it’s linear, as in a 28 BMI is better than a 26.5, but I do think a threshold is probably needed. Most WRs at the combine hit at least 26 because that’s just the typical pool of NFL players. This year is odd because the top 2 consensus WRs did not register a 26, but draft capital cures a lot of ills. The lesser known players that didn’t get to 26 got dinged for me because their draft slot was already tenuous. 

Please, blog, may I have some more?